Daily OM for Nov. 4th – Learned Self-reliance

Learned Self-reliance

The Negative Effects of Spoiling Children

by Madisyn Taylor

When children are spoiled we do them a great disservice because they are not being allowed to earn and learn.

Parents are moved by instinct to love, nurture, and provide for their offspring. Because our children are so much a part of us, we want to see them blissfully happy. Also, our own desire to be liked, materialist pressures, and a fervent wish that our c

hildren have everything we lacked as youngsters can prompt us to spoil them. However, while it might seem that buying your child expensive gifts will give them fond memories of childhood or that you can heal your emotional wounds by doting on your sons and daughters, you may be unconsciously interfering with your children’s evolutional development. One of the most precious gifts you can grant your children is the true independence they gain when they learn to earn what they covet and become stewards of their own happiness. Try allowing your children to experience life to the fullest. Let them work and earn what they want. When the time comes for them to go to college and enter the workforce, you will have the confidence that you have raised a child that can both enter and contribute to society confidently.

When children are not afforded the opportunity to explore self-reliance, to understand that with possession comes price, and to fulfill their own needs, they develop a sense of entitlement that blinds them to the necessity of hard work and the needs of others. We may spoil children because giving them gifts is pleasurable. Or we may want to avoid conflict out of fear that our children won’t love us. Yet children who are given acceptance, love, and affection in abundance are often kinder, more charitable, and more responsible than those whose parents accede to their every material demand. They develop a strong sense of self that stretches beyond possessions and the approval of their peers, and as adults they understand that each individual is responsible for building the life they desire. If you find yourself giving in to your child’s every whim, ask yourself why. You may discover that you are trying to answer for what you feel is lacking in your own life.

Rearing your children to respect the value of money and self-sufficiency as they grow from infants to young adults is a challenging but rewarding process. It can be difficult to watch a child struggle to meet a personal goal yet wonderful to be by their side as they achieve it. Your choice not to spoil your children will bless you with more opportunities to show them understanding and compassion and to be fully present with them as they journey toward adulthood.

The Daily OM

The Heart of Unconditional Love

The Heart of Unconditional Love

From the laughter of children at play to the golden rays of the sun
beaming through the sky at sunset, the eternal song of love permeates
all creation. Each beat of our heart pulses to this rhythm in a majestic
and graceful dance connecting us to everyone and everything. Life is
magnificent when we quiet our outer selves and become fully present and
aware of our own loving essence.

To know this grander love is to go beyond the sensation of a first kiss
or a mother’s tender touch in time of need. Although these
extraordinary expressions reveal the existence of love, there is so much
more. This universal love is unconditional and its very presence ignites
our passion and our compassion. It breathes life into our being and
sustains us. It encourages and illuminates the infinite possibilities
while simultaneously providing all that we require to be alive.

It is our heart center that gently nudges us to know and express love in
all that we are. However this does not always come easily. Through eons
of time, the conditioning by our mind to seek logic and reasoning in our
daily affairs has left little trust in the wisdom of the heart. Learning
to once again cultivate our intuition, be intimate with our own unique
understanding of love, and to feel this love deeply, takes both courage
and strength.

Unconditional love is our consistent source of nurturing, inspiration
and potential. Interestingly, we often seek the beauty of nature for its
extraordinary ability to be in constant change while ever expressing its
interconnected uniqueness. This is what captivates and also reminds us
of our own innate capacity to do the same. Nature has the ability to
cycle, recycle, adapt, reclaim and reinvent itself over and over by
simply fulfilling its distinctive purpose with love for all.

When we allow unconditional love to be our personal guiding intention,
our energy flows in the same manner. We stay present in the moment and
share our love without reservation or hesitation. We change, evolve,
expand and express our creativity in new ways ensuring that it benefits
the whole. In this way, life itself evolves through each of us.

You are the heart of unconditional love. What you choose, we all
experience.

 

A Little Humor for Your Day – ‘Jail vs. Work’

Jail Vs. Work

IN PRISON…you spend the majority of your time in an 8X10 cell.
AT WORK … you spend the majority of your time in a 6X8 cubicle.

IN PRISON…you get three meals a day.
AT WORK…you only get a break for one meal and you pay for it.

IN PRISON…you get time off for good behavior
AT WORK…you get more work for good behavior

IN PRISON…the guard locks and unlocks all the doors for you.
AT WORK…you must carry around a security card and open all the doors for yourself.

IN PRISON…you can watch TV and play games.
AT WORK…you get fired for watching TV and playing games.

IN PRISON…you get your own toilet.
AT WORK…you have to share with some idiot who pees on the seat.

IN PRISON…they allow your family and friends to visit.
AT WORK…you can’t even speak to your family.

IN PRISON…the taxpayers pay all expenses with no work required.
AT WORK…you get to pay all the expenses to go to work and then they deduct taxes from your salary to pay for prisoners.

IN PRISON…you spend most of your life inside bars wanting to get  out.
AT WORK…you spend most of your time wanting to get out and go inside bars.

IN PRISON…you must deal with sadistic wardens.
AT WORK…they are called managers.

Your Charm for October 29th is The Tusk

Your Charm for Today

The Tusk

Today’s Meaning:  

There is a good vibration surrounding this aspect. It feels better than it has in quite some time. Maintain your faith in your deity of choice and this good vibration will remain. Waiver from your faith and this good vibration will dissipate.

General Description:

This Etruscan talisman – a tusk carved in basalt, and elaborately mounted in gold filigree work – was worn as a protector from danger and evil influences. The charm was supposed to attract good fortune and success. The Tusk represented one of the horns of the Crescent Moon, which was a symbol of the Egyptian goddess Isis, who, in the course of time, became the most universal nad powerful of all the goddesses. The Etruscans, Greeks and romans had great faith in the reputed virtues of amulets, a belief which was greatly influenced by the Egyptians.

Your Ancient Symbol Card for October 14th is The Storm

Your Ancient Symbol Card for Today

The Storm

The Storm represents the trouble and discord that creep into our lives from time to time. The storm is represented by a tornado whirling its way across a fertile plain. Tornados are powerful but relatively small, short lived storms, which means that while the turmoil they indicate may be strong it will at least pass quickly. Like the tornado, The Storm is a force outside yourself and beyond your control. During a stormy period you may lose ground. However, knowing one is upon you can certainly help you keep your losses to a minimum, or even turn what might be a disaster into a windfall.

As a daily card, The Storm denotes a time when you should be prepared to face some large challenges in your life. You may find yourself losing more than you gain for awhile. The key to weathering the storm is preparation. You know its coming, so be ready for it and there is a possibility that you can transform a tumultuous event into something good.

Calendar of the Sun for December 29th

Calendar of the Sun

29 Yulmonath

Skadi’s Blot

Color: White
Element: Air
Altar: Upon cloth of white set snowflakes, frosted branches, a horn of mead, the figure of a white wolf, a pair of skis, a pair of snowshoes, a bow and arrows, and a bowl of meat.
Offerings: Meat left to the forest spirits.
Daily Meal: Hoofed animal meat.

Invocation to Skadi

Hail, Huntress of the snow and ice!
Hail, wife of Njord the sea-god
Who would not compromise with anyone,
Nor live on the shore near the sea-birds
Rather than your beloved snowy mountains.
We who struggle between the tracks
Left by Your winter sleigh,
We whose bloody marks You track,
Skillful in your cold eye,
We hail you, Mistress of Survival!
Etin-bride of winter, Your cloak
Spreads white over the fields,
The icy wind Your breath,
White wolf in the snow,
Lady of the crisp clean starry sky
Over the frozen tundra.
Teach us of the narrow edge between
Living and dying, and of that struggle,
And the cold, naked truth that it reveals.
Catch us naked in the snow, Lady,
We shall bare our throats to your wisdom
And count ourselves lucky.

Song: Snow Queen

(The mead is poured out as a libation. The meat is taken to a wild place and left for the animals to eat in their time.)

 

[Pagan Book of Hours]

A Blessed & Glorious Tuesday Morning To All!

Good Tuesday Morning, dearest friends!  I hope it is a beautiful and glorious day wherever you are. Today I have one word I want to emphasis, it is “VOTE!”

Today is a very, very important day. It is a day that if you don’t vote you could regret for the rest of your life. Seriously, I honestly believe the rights of women are at stake and also our Religious freedoms. Maybe you think I am an extremist in regards to these two issues. But I can guarantee you I am not. I have done my research and I believe with all my heart, we have a lot to lose if the wrong candidates get elected. Stop to think about it, then go to your local voting place and vote your heart. Whatever you do today, make your voice heard and vote!

Time for Me to Take A Moment To Be Human, lol!

Thought I would take a moment to check in with you, lol! I found that silly graphic in my pics when I was digging a while ago. Couldn’t remember if I had ever used it or not? I figured what the heck, why not, go for it!

I don’t know if most of you know or not but I am a night owl by nature. I will probably pass out tonight around 8:00 pm. This is mainly because of my medicine I take in the evening. Then I will sleep till about 2:30 am, get up and I am wide awake all morning. Well till I sit down at the computer anyway. So I find something on TV to entertain me while I do the posts. And it is the Jerry Springer show!

I don’t know if any of you are familiar with the Jerry Springer show but I love it (I’m not mentally deranged, now). But what some of the people come on there and do and say. It is unbelievable that people actually act like that, let alone on TV. Good grief! You have a few of them that come on there and they say, “it can’t be good, I’m on the Jerry Springer show!” So why did you come then, huh?

The show always has a question of the day. Today’s question was, “If you were asked to come on the Jerry Springer show would you come?” Now you are suppose to call a phone number and answer this question. Yeah right! I don’t know if they would want to hear my answer or not, “Hell, NO!” I would probably ask who wanted me on there and then say the other.

I was wondering, do normal people go on there and then turn into crazy people because of the situation they are told? If you got a phone call and they wanted you to go on the show, would you go? If you did, you would have to take a sign and hold it up with your internet ID and have it read, “Lady A, it’s me!” But seriously, would you go?

I can’t wait to hear your answers.

Just In – ‘American Bandstand’ Host Dick Clark Has Died

‘American Bandstand’ Host Dick Clark Has Died

 

BY LYNN ELBER,AP Television Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Dick Clark, the ever-youthful television host and tireless entrepreneur who helped bring rock ‘n’ roll into the mainstream on “American Bandstand,” and later produced and hosted a vast range of programming from game shows to the year-end countdown from Times Square on “New Year’s Rockin’ Eve,” has died. He was 82.

Spokesman Paul Shefrin said Clark had a heart attack Wednesday morning at Saint John’s hospital in Santa Monica, a day after he was admitted for an outpatient procedure.

Clark had continued performing even after he suffered a stroke in 2004 that affected his ability to speak and walk.

The world’s oldest teenager

Long dubbed “the world’s oldest teenager” because of his boyish appearance, Clark bridged the rebellious new music scene and traditional show business, and equally comfortable whether chatting about music with Sam Cooke or bantering with Ed McMahon about TV bloopers. He thrived as the founder of Dick Clark Productions, supplying movies, game and music shows, beauty contests and more to TV. Among his credits: “The $25,000 Pyramid,” ”TV’s Bloopers and Practical Jokes” and the American Music Awards.

For a time in the 1980s, he had shows on all three networks and was listed among the Forbes 400 of wealthiest Americans. Clark also was part of radio as partner in the United Stations Radio Network, which provided programs — including Clark’s — to thousands of stations.

“There’s hardly any segment of the population that doesn’t see what I do,” Clark told The Associated Press in a 1985 interview. “It can be embarrassing. People come up to me and say, ‘I love your show,’ and I have no idea which one they’re talking about.”

The original “American Bandstand” was one of network TV’s longest-running series as part of ABC’s daytime lineup from 1957 to 1987. It later aired for a year in syndication and briefly on the USA Network. Over the years, it introduced stars ranging from Buddy Holly to Madonna. The show’s status as an American cultural institution was solidified when Clark donated Bandstand’s original podium and backdrop to the Smithsonian Institution.

Clark joined “Bandstand” in 1956 after Bob Horn, who’d been the host since its 1952 debut, was fired. Under Clark’s guidance, it went from a local Philadelphia show to a national phenomenon.

“I played records, the kids danced, and America watched,” was how Clark once described the series’ simplicity. In his 1958 hit “Sweet Little Sixteen,” Chuck Berry sang that “they’ll be rocking on Bandstand, Philadelphia, P-A.”

As a host, he had the smooth delivery of a seasoned radio announcer. As a producer, he had an ear for a hit record. He also knew how to make wary adults welcome this odd new breed of music in their homes.

Clark endured accusations that he was in with the squares, with critic Lester Bangs defining Bandstand as “a leggily acceptable euphemism of the teenage experience.” In a 1985 interview, Clark acknowledged the complaints. “But I knew at the time that if we didn’t make the presentation to the older generation palatable, it could kill it.”

“So along with Little Richard and Chuck Berry and the Platters and the Crows and the Jayhawks … the boys wore coats and ties and the girls combed their hair and they all looked like sweet little kids into a high school dance,” he said.

Fought censorship

But Clark defended pop artists and artistic freedom, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame said in an online biography of the 1993 inductee. He helped give black artists their due by playing original R&B recordings instead of cover versions by white performers, and he condemned censorship.

His stroke in December 2004 forced him to miss his annual appearance on “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve.” He returned the following year and, although his speech at times was difficult to understand, many praised his bravery, including other stroke victims.

Still speaking with difficulty, he continued taking part in his New Year’s shows, though in a diminished role. Ryan Seacrest became the main host.

“I’m just thankful I’m still able to enjoy this once-a-year treat,” he told The Associated Press by e-mail in December 2008 as another New Year’s Eve approached.

He was honored at the Emmy Awards in 2006, telling the crowd: “I have accomplished my childhood dream, to be in show business. Everybody should be so lucky to have their dreams come true. I’ve been truly blessed.”

He was born Richard Wagstaff Clark in Mount Vernon, N.Y., in 1929. His father, Richard Augustus Clark, was a sales manager who worked in radio.

Clark idolized his athletic older brother, Bradley, who was killed in World War II. In his 1976 autobiography, “Rock, Roll & Remember,” Clark recalled how radio helped ease his loneliness and turned him into a fan of Steve Allen, Arthur Godfrey and other popular hosts.

From Godfrey, he said, he learned that “a radio announcer does not talk to ‘those of you out there in radio land’; a radio announcer talks to me as an individual.”

Clark began his career in the mailroom of a Utica, N.Y., radio station in 1945. By age 26, he was a broadcasting veteran, with nine years’ experience on radio and TV stations in Syracuse and Utica, N.Y., and Philadelphia. He held a bachelor’s degree from Syracuse University. While in Philadelphia, Clark befriended McMahon, who later credited Clark for introducing him to his future “Tonight Show” boss, Johnny Carson.

In the 1960s, “American Bandstand” moved from black-and-white to color, from weekday broadcasts to once-a-week Saturday shows and from Philadelphia to Los Angeles. Although its influence started to ebb, it still featured some of the biggest stars of each decade, whether Janis Joplin, the Jackson 5, Talking Heads or Prince. But Clark never did book two of rock’s iconic groups, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. Elvis Presley also never performed, although Clark managed an on-air telephone interview while Presley was in the Army.

Remembering Michael Jackson

When Michael Jackson died in June 2009, Clark recalled working with him since he was a child, adding, “of all the thousands of entertainers I have worked with, Michael was THE most outstanding. Many have tried and will try to copy him, but his talent will never be matched.”

Clark kept more than records spinning with his Dick Clark Productions. Its credits included the Academy of Country Music and Golden Globe awards; TV movies including the Emmy-winning “The Woman Who Willed a Miracle” (1984), the “$25,000 Pyramid” game show and the 1985 film “Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins.” Clark himself made a cameo on “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” and a dramatic appearance as a witness on the original “Perry Mason.” He was an involuntary part of Michael Moore’s Academy Award-winning “Bowling for Columbine,” in which Clark is seen brushing off Moore as the filmmaker confronts him about working conditions at a restaurant owned by Clark.

In 1974, at ABC’s request, Clark created the American Music Awards after the network lost the broadcast rights to the Grammy Awards.

He was also an author, with “Dick Clark’s American Bandstand” and such self-help books as “Dick Clark’s Program for Success in Your Business and Personal Life” and “Looking Great, Staying Young.” His unchanging looks inspired a joke in “Peggy Sue Gets Married,” the 1986 comedy starring Kathleen Turner as an unhappy wife and mother transported back to 1960. Watching Clark on a black and white TV set, she shakes her head in amazement, “Look at that man, he never ages.”

Clark’s clean-cut image survived a music industry scandal. In 1960, during a congressional investigation of “payola” or bribery in the record and radio industry, Clark was called on to testify.

He was cleared of any suspicions but was required by ABC to divest himself of record-company interests to avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest. The demand cost him $8 million, Clark once estimated. His holdings included partial ownership of Swan Records, which later released the first U.S. version of the Beatles’ smash “She Loves You.”

In 2004, Clark announced plans for a revamped version of “American Bandstand.” The show, produced with “American Idol” creator Simon Fuller, was to feature a host other than Clark.

He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1994 and served as spokesman for the American Association of Diabetes Educators.

Clark, twice divorced, had a son, Richard Augustus II, with first wife Barbara Mallery and two children, Duane and Cindy, with second wife Loretta Martin. He married Kari Wigton in 1977.