The Mystery of Flowers and Plants (Part 2 C – D)

Cactus – (endurance – burning love – maternal love – strength)

Cacti are unique, distinctive plants, adapted to extremely arid and hot climates and have water conserving features. Their stems have green succulent structures containing the chlorophyll necessary for growth and life, the leaves have become the spines for which cacti are so well known. The cactus is a hardy and resilient plant.

Calendula – (despair – grief – sorrow)

Calendula blossoms are used to ease indigestion, and calendula petals are used in ointments to heal skin irritations, jaundice, sore eyes and toothaches.

Calla Lily – (magnificent beauty)

The calla lily is native to southern Africa and is visible in many works of art.

Camellia – (perfection – gratitude – reasoning – admiration – good luck)

Each colour has a symbolic meaning including innate worth, adoration, perfection and loveliness (white) innate worth, adoration, perfection, loveliness, (pink) longing, longing for love, (red) excellence, heart flame. The English name is derived from the Latin name camellia, named after the Czech-born missionary and botanist George Josef Kamel, whose name was originally derived from the word kamel, meaning “camel.”

Carnation – (impulsiveness – joy – devotion – love – fascination – capriciousness) white carnation meaning (disdain – refusal)

Carnations were used in Greek ceremonial crowns. The name carnation may come from the Greek carnis (flesh) and refer to the incarnation of God made flesh. The English name derived from the flower name, from French carnation, meaning “complexion,” from Italian carnagione, meaning “flesh-colored.” The carnation is also known as “the poor man’s rose.”

Cattail – (prosperity – peace)

Cattails or bulrushes, are wetland plants with spongy, strap-like leaves and creeping stems, the thick root can be ground to make a flour substitute. The spread of cattails assists the process of open water bodies being converted to vegetated marshland and eventually to dry land.

Chamomile (action – movement – energy)

The extract of German chamomile is taken as a strong tea and is used in herbal medicine as a digestive aid, it has anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile tea is used to calm the nerves and chamomile makes an excellent mouthwash against mouth and gum infections. It is used in ointments and lotions and is very soothing.

Cherry Blossom (learning – education)

In China the cherry blossom is a symbol of feminine beauty, it represents the feminine principle and love. Falling blossoms symbolise fallen warriors who died in battle, and symbolise the samurai. Cherry blossoms in Japan are symbolise the transience of life because of their short blooming times.

Christmas Rose

The Christmas rose is purported to have flowered on Christmas Day, thus associated with the infant Jesus. It is a member of the genus Helleborus and is not related to the rose bush. The Christmas Rose (sometimes known as the Lenten Rose) of Mary Gardens, bears pure white or pink flowers.

Chrysanthemum – (wealth – optimism – cheerfulness – abundance)

The name is derived from the feminine form of Greek (Chrysanthos), meaning “golden flower.” Chrysanthemums are associated with death in Italy. Colour meanings (white) truth, hope, rest and friendship, (red) love, (yellow) slighted love. The Japanese put a single chrysanthemum petal on the bottom of a wine glass to sustain a long and healthy life, and Japanese emperors sat on their Chrysanthemum throne. The name is derived from the feminine form of Greek Chrysanthos, meaning “golden flower.

Crocus – (joy – happiness – cheerfulness)

The genus crocus is in the iris family, the plants grow from corm, are mainly perennials and found in woodland and meadows, crocuses are native to central and southern Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, central Asia and China.

Cyclamen – (goodbye – resignation)

Cyclamen grow in dry forest or scrub areas, have white, bright pink, red or purple flowers, and are native to Africa and the Mediterranean. They are part of the primrose family, although bare no resemblance.

Daffodil – (regard – chivalry – respect – unrequited love – sunshine – happiness)

In Greek mythology the daffodil is described as a pale yellow deathless kind of lily flower, that overspreads the plains of Hades, and is the favourite food of the dead. The traditional daffodil has a yellow to golden-yellow color all over, and due to breeding the daffodil may be variously colored. Breeders have developed some daffodils with double, triple, or ambiguously multiple rows of petals, and several wild species have double variants. The English name is derived from the flower name, from Latin asphodelus, from Greek asphodelos, meaning “asphodel flower.”

Dandelion (nature’s oracle)

In Medieval times the dandelion was called lion’s teeth, because its leaves had jagged tooth like edges. The dandelion has for centuries been consulted as an oracle, the time can be told by the number of blows to get rid of the seeds. For a prophecy about how long it is until your wedding day, count the number of seeds left after you have blown on them once, the number of seeds left tells you how many years it will be.

Dahlia – (forever – dignity – elegance – forever thine)

The dahlia was used as a food source in the 1940’s by the Europeans, when the French potato crop was destroyed by disease. The dahlia is named after Anders Dahl, the 18th century Swedish botanist. The English name is derived from the flower name, taken from the surname of Anders Dahl, meaning “valley,” from this “dahlia flower” or “valley flower. The Aztecs used dahlias to treat epilepsy.

Daisy – (feelings shared – innocence – purity – beauty – simplicity – loyalty – love) also known as (“flowery mead”)

The English name is derived from the flower name, from Old English daegeseage, “day’s eye. “Hairpins decorated with daisies were found during the excavation of the Minoan Palace on the Island of Crete, and daisies are believed to be several thousand years old. Egyptian ceramics were decorated with daisies. Maidens grabbed a bunch of daises with their eyes closed, then counted them to find out how many years until they were to marry. Originally known as ‘bruisword’, and used to heal bruises. It is considered good luck to step on the first daisy of the year

Dandelion – (affection requited – sympathy – happiness – love’s oracle – faithfulness – desire)

The dandelion is native to Europe and Asia, in northern areas and places where the dandelion is not native, it has become a weed.

Day Lily – (forgetting worries) in China (symbolic of devotion to mother)

The flower means “Suited for A Boy,” it was used as a lucky talisman by expectant mothers who wished for a baby boy. “In China when the day lily has a cheerful position, the flower is called “Wong Yu.”

Delphinium – (levity – ardent attachment – fun – light of heart – joyous)

Delphinium derived from the French form of the Latin, Delphinia, meaning “woman from Delphi.” The flower resembles nose of the dolphin, and delphiums were thought to repel scorpions. The Native Americans used delphiniums to make blue dye, and the Europeans made ink.

FROM: http://witcheslore.com/bookofshadows/herbology/the-mystery-of-flowers-and-plants/3649/

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